Accelerated Catalan I

Alba Girons Masot
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Spring
2016-17
Catalan Language
CATA 11100

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. Students with no prior knowledge of a Romance Language are also welcome. PQ: Familiarity with a Romance language is recommended.

Accelerated Catalan II

Alba Girons Masot
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Catalan Language
CATA 11200

In this intermediate-level course, students learn to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages. This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in CATA 11100. PQ: CATA 11100, CATA 12200 or consent of instructor.

Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Summer
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 13120

Our summer Portuguese course helps students gain intermediate skills in spoken and written Portuguese quickly by building on their prior knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to make very quick progress and to develop their abilities for further study at the advanced level or for professional purposes. This course provides 140 contact hours and accepts the FLAS grant as full tuition. PQ: At least one year of recent college-level study of Spanish, French, or Italian.

Advanced Portuguese

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 20200

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through exposure to written and oral documents (e.g., literary texts, interviews). Students are taught the grammatical and lexical tools necessary to understand these documents, as well as to produce their own analysis and commentaries.

Approches à l'analyse littéraire

Daisy Delogu
Level: Both
Autumn
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 21503/31503

Dans ce cours nous aborderons des techniques d’analyse littéraire des textes en vers et en prose. En outre, nous nous pencherons sur des écrits métatextuels – ceux qui traitent des aspects formels des ouvrages littéraires, de leur utilité morale et/ou politique, du rapport entre la littérature et la vie dite réelle. La production littéraire est non seulement une activité culturelle, intellectuelle, politique, éthique, et aesthétique, mais aussi l’objet d’une réeflexion soutenue au cours des siècles. PQ: FREN 20500 or consent of instructor. Taught in French.

BA Paper Preparation: French

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. PQ: consent of undergraduate adviser. 

BA Paper Preparation: Italian

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. PQ: consent of undergraduate adviser. 

BA Paper Preparation: Spanish

Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29900

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. PQ: Consent of undergraduate adviser. 

Beautiful Souls, Adventurers and Rogues. The European 18th Century Novel

Thomas Pavel
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 25301/35301
CMLT 24401/34401, SCTH 38240

The course will examine several major eighteenth-century novels, including Manon Lescaut by Prevost, Pamela and fragments from Clarissa by Richardson, Shamela and fragments from Joseph Andrews by Fielding, Jacques le Fataliste by Diderot, and The Sufferings of Young Werther by Goethe. Taught in English.

Beginning Elementary French I

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary French II

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 10200

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Beginning Elementary French III

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 10300

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Italian I

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Italian II

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 10200

This course offer a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in ITAL 10100.

Beginning Elementary Italian III

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 10300

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese I

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Portuguese and for students who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese II

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 10200

This course is a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in PORT 10100.

Beginning Elementary Portuguese III

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 10300

This course expands on the material presented in PORT 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Spanish I

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 10100

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Beginning Elementary Spanish II

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 10200

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Beginning Elementary Spanish III

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 10300

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Boccaccio’s Decameron

Justin Steinberg
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 23502/33502
FNDL 21714

One of the most important and influential works of the middle ages—and a lot funnier than the Divine Comedy. Boccaccio’s Decameron, written in the midst of the social disruption caused by the Black Death (1348), may have held readers attention for centuries because of its bawdiness, but it is also a profound exploration into the basis of faith and the meaning of death, the status of language, the construction of social hierarchy and social order, and the nature of crisis and historical change. Framed by a story telling contest between seven young ladies and three young men who have left the city to avoid the plague, the one hundred stories of the Decameron form a structural masterpiece that anticipates Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the Renaissance epics, and the modern short story. We will especially focus on how the work explores the intersection of legal and literary representation but students will be encouraged to further explore in individual projects the many topics raised by the text, including (and in addition to the themes mentioned above) magic, the visual arts, mercantile culture, travel and discovery, and new religious practices. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. 

 

Brazilian Avant-Gardes

Victoria Saramago
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Portuguese Literature
PORT 26810/36810
LACS 26810/36810

Avant-garde movements, tendencies, and artists have been present in Brazil throughout the 20th century. From the paradigmatic Week of Modern Art in 1922 to the Tropicalism of the 1960s and 1970s, this course revisits works of fiction, poetry, essay, visual arts, film, and music that have shaped the Brazilian avant-gardes. We will focus on the Modernist Movement, Concretism, Neoconcretism, New Cinema, Tropicalism, and regional avant-garde movements produced across the country. Taught in English, with readings available in Portuguese and English.

Brazilian Theater and Film

Victoria Saramago
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Literature
PORT 21903
LACS 21905

This course offers an overview of theater and cinema in Brazil, from the late 19th century to the present. Through an array of films and plays, students will become familiar with cultural, aesthetic, political, social, and environmental aspects of Brazil. The course will also discuss performance, adaptation, and intersections between theater and film. Play writers and film makers may include Qorpo Santo, Oswald de Andrade, Nelson Rodrigues, Ariano Suassuna, Plínio Marcos, Denise Stoklos, Mário Peixoto, Glauber Rocha, Susana Amaral, Guel Arraes, Lucia Murat, Eduardo Coutinho, and Kleber Mendoça Filho, among others. Taught in English, with readings available in Portuguese and English.

Català avançat: Llengua, societat i cultura

Alba Girons Masot
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Catalan Language
CATA 21100

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through the study of a wide variety of contemporary texts and audiovisual materials. It will provide students with a better understanding of contemporary Catalan society. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates. PQ: CATA 11200, CATA 12300 or consent of instructor

Catalan Avant-Garde Theater

Núria Perpinyà
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
Spanish, Catalan Literature
CATA 22900/32900
SPAN 22900/32910, TAPS

Theatre is the mirror of the nation. The clearest expression of its urges, its battles, and as Adorno would say, of its own contradictions. Catalunya is one of the most modern and European-like countries of the west. This desire for modernism is expressed in artists such Salvador Dalí as well as the avant-garde daydreaming theater of La Fura dels Baus. In Catalunya, a small country, theater has been the national defense during Franco’s dictatorship and in the present times serves as a nationalist weapon to claim the independence. In this course, we will explore the history of Catalunya and Europe through theatre, by means of written literature and performances’ footages which will make lectures more dynamic and attractive. Also, we will meet the personal dramas of women, and their social and historical implications through the theory of gender.

Theatre is a recreational and collective way of understanding a culture, thus it will be proposed to the students the possibility to create a short play written and performed by them.

Methodologically, the course is multifaceted and intertextual. The analysis tools are comparatist, historical, political, linguistic, psychiatric and philosophical; the approach is creative (writing and acting) and related to cultural studies and feminism. The aim is to demonstrate that the Catalan drama is a splendid window to get to know the Catalan culture and is fully integrated into contemporary theatre. The plays studied range from the thirties to the present day. Catalan texts will be provided translated into English or Spanish. Classes will be conducted in Spanish and English.

Catalan Culture and Society: Art, music and cinema

Girons Mason
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish, Catalan Literature
CATA 21600
SPAN 21610

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standarization of Catalan. A couple of sessions will be devoted to acquiring a "survival Catalan.”

Claire Denis

Dominique Bluher
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 26803
CMST 26803

Claire Denis is one of the major artistic voices in contemporary French cinema, and one of the most challenging filmmakers working today. In over 25 years, she has created an impressive body of work from across a wide variety of genres ranging from semi-autobiographical films informed by her own experiences during her childhood in Africa (Chocolat, White Material) to allegorical horror films (Trouble Every Day). Currently she is working on her first English language science-fiction film High-Life. I Can’t Sleep is based on the true story of Thierry Paulin, a gay, black, HIV-positive, transvestite and serial killer. Her best-known film to date, Beau Travail, is loosely inspired by Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, and The Intruder by the homonymous autobiographical essay by French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy. We will also have a look at her lesser known films for television, her documentaries about dance and music, and her short films. Students taking the class for French credit are expected to complete written assignments (and readings as applicable) in French.

Classical Film Theory

David Rodowick
Level: Both
Autumn
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 27220/37220
CMST 27220/37220

This seminar will present a critical survey of the principal authors, concepts, and the main though not exclusive emphasis will be the period of silent film and theorists writing in the context of French and German cinema. We will study the aesthetic debates of the period in their historical context, whose central questions include: Is film an art? If so, what specific and autonomous means of expression define it as an aesthetic medium? What defines the social force and function of cinema as a mass art? Weekly readings and discussion will examine major film movements of the classical period—for example, French impressionism and Surrealism—as well as the work of major figures such as Hugo Münsterberg, Rudolf Arnheim, Jean Epstein, Germaine Dulac, Béla Balázs, Erwin Panofsky, Hans Richter, Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, and André Bazin. PQ: CMST 10100 or permission of instructor.

Cómo domar una pluma salvaje': territorialidad, identidad, y resistencia en literatura mexicoamericana/chicana

José Estrada
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 28116
LACS 28116

En este curso se estudiará la literatura y otros medios artísticos mexicoamericanos/chicanos desde el siglo XVI hasta el siglo XXI. Tendrá tres ejes: la caracterización del espacio y lugar, metafórico y tangible; algunos aspectos de identidad y auto representación en distintos periodos históricos; y el surgimiento y cuestionamiento del movimiento chicano, a través del lenguaje utilizado en la literatura. La diversa ascendencia mexicana, mestiza, europea, y/o indígena dentro de un contexto estadounidense; y la alargada historia de conquista, colonización, guerra y opresión; dan a luz a un lenguaje variado que con frecuencia obliga que la historia se adelante al presente. Dicho lenguaje nos conlleva a la formación de identidad que, como se verá en los textos, fluctúan dependiendo del contexto histórico. La clase también se ahondará en la representación y (re)creación de los momentos históricos e imaginarios. La mayoría de los textos primarios son textos escritos en o traducidos al español, sin embargo, debido a la complejidad cultural mexicoamericana/chicana, los textos también incluyen palabras en inglés, náhuatl, y/o caló. De esta manera, la clase busca introducir al estudiante sobre maneras de aproximarse al texto y al lenguaje en un género poco estudiado dentro del ámbito académico en español. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent. Taught in Spanish.

Composición y conversación avanzada I

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20400

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.

Composición y conversación avanzada II

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20500

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production. PQ: SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor.

Contemporary Catalan Literature

Alba Girons Masot
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Spanish, Catalan Literature
CATA 21900/31900
SPAN 21910/31910

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Corso di perfezionamento

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 20400

This course helps students achieve a very high level of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. Using a variety of literary and nonliterary texts as models, students examine the linguistic structure and organization of several types of written Italian discourse. This course is also intended to help students attain high levels in reading, speaking, and listening through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Italian society.

Culturas populares en el mundo ibérico (siglos XVI-XVII)

Miguel Martínez
Level: Grad
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 31800

The popular classes of early modern Europe engaged in a rich array of cultural practices, including the production and consumption of a wide variety of literary materials. In the Iberian peninsula, moreover, some of the central cultural phenomena of the period are difficult to understand without taking into account the specifically popular social distribution of their uses and appropriations. In this seminar we will explore, for instance, popular readings of the Amadís, carnivalesque discourses and practices, the complexity and multiplicity of the romancero, the development of popular print and pliegos de cordel, the theater of playwrights such as Gil Vicente, Lope de Rueda, Lope de Vega, and Cervantes, or the autobiographies of the Catalan tanner Miquel Parets and the Valencian typographer Juan Martín Cordero. In order to seriously engage in a theoretical discussion about the complex notion of popular culture, we will also read classic essays by Bakhtin, Burke, Ginzburg, De Certeau, Chartier, Gramsci, Frow, Fiske, Caro Baroja, Redondo, and Maravall. Taught in Spanish.

Curso de Aperfeiçoamento

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 21500

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding, summarizing, and producing written and spoken arguments in Portuguese through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Luso-Brazilian societies. Special consideration is given to the major differences between continental and Brazilian Portuguese. In addition to reading, analyzing, and commenting on advanced texts (both literary and nonliterary), students practice and extend their writing skills in a series of compositions.

Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20402

This advanced language course helps students achieve mastery of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. A wide variety of literary, historiographic, and sociological texts are read. Through writing a number of essays and participating in class debates, students are guided in the examination of linguistic structures and organization of several types of written Spanish discourse. This course also enhances awareness of the cultural diversity within the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its historical roots. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor

Discurso académico para hablantes nativos

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20602

This seminar/practicum focuses on developing vocabulary and discourse styles for academic verbal communication. This goal is achieved through exposure to taped formal and informal interviews and public debate in the media. Most important, however, is active class participation. Through a number of class presentations, students put into practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). We also read numerous Spanish newspapers. PQ: Open only to native speakers.

Ecocritical Perspectives in Latin American Literature and Film

Victoria Saramago
Level: Grad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 34110
LACS 34110 PORT 34110

This course provides a survey of of ecocritical studies in Latin America. Through novels, poems, and films, we will examine a range of trends and problems posed by Latin American artists concerning environmental issues, from mid-19th century to contemporary literature and film. Readings also include works of ecocritical criticism and theory that have been shaping the field in the past decades. Taught in Spanish. PQ: Undergraduate students may enroll with prior consent from the instructor. Taught in Spanish.

Ecrire en française

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 20500

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French are required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French

Expression orale et phonétique

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 20601

This course focuses on developing the tools necessary for advanced oral proficiency in an academic context. Through active class participation involving a number of class presentations, students practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). Special emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation. This course does not count toward major or minor requirements.

Fact and Fiction: Hoaxes and Misunderstandings

Francoise Lavocat
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 24017/34017
CMLT 24017/34017, SCTH 34017

This course will focus on fictional texts that readers have misrecognized as factual accounts, as well as the less frequent case of factual texts misidentified as fictional. Students will study the rhetorical strategies or historical and cultural circumstances responsible for these “errors of pragmatic framing” (O. Caïra) by investigating the contexts governing the production or reception of works such as Apuleius’ The Golden Ass, Les Lettres d’une religieuse portugaise, Denis Diderot’s La Religieuse, Wolfgang Hildesheimer’s Marbot: A Biography, and Orson Welles’ adaptation of The War of the Worlds, among others.

Foreign Language Acquisition, Research and Teaching

Veronica Vegna
Level: Grad
Autumn
2016-17
RLLT Literature
RLLT 38800

This course provides students with a foundation in foreign language acquisition and sociolinguistic research pertinent to foreign language teaching and introduces current teaching methodologies and technologies and their usefulness in the classroom. PQ: Open to RLL students only.

Gramsci

Rocco Rubini
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 26000/36000
REMS 36000, FNDL 26206, CMLT 26002/36002

In this course we read selections from Antonio Gramsci’s Letters and Prison Notebooks side by side with their sources. Gramsci’s influential interpretations of the Italian Renaissance, Risorgimento, and Fascism are reviewed testi alla mano with the aim of reassessing some major turning points in Italian intellectual history. Readings and notions introduced include, for the Renaissance, Petrarch (“the cosmopolitan intellectual”), Savonarola (the “disarmed prophet”), Machiavelli (the “modern prince”), and Guicciardini (the “particulare”); for Italy’s “long Risorgimento,” Vico (“living philology”), Cuoco (“passive revolution”), Manzoni (“questione della lingua”), Gioberti (“clericalism”), and De Sanctis (the “Man of Guicciardini”); and Croce (the “anti-Croce”) and Pirandello (theater and “national-popular” literature), for Italy’s twentieth century. Language to be determined by class makeup.

Intermediate Portuguese

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 20100

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of Luso-Brazilian tradition through a variety of texts.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del modernismo al presente

Laura Gandolfi
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 22003
LACS 22003

En este curso haremos un recorrido panorámico por algunas de las principales tendencias de la escritura hispanoamericana y sus diásporas desde a finales del siglo XIX hasta el presente. Habremos de prestar particular atención no sólo a las dimensiones estéticas de los textos sino también a las condiciones socio-históricas y políticas que los posibilitaron y en las que, a su vez, ellos incidieron. Entre los autores y autoras a estudiar se encuentran José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, María Luisa Bombal, Horacio Quiroga, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Luis Rafael Sánchez y Pedro Pietri, entre otros/as. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos

Manuel Olmedo
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21703

En este curso estudiamos algunas de las obras más importantes de las tres primeras épocas de la literatura española: época medieval, Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro (modernidad temprana). Analizamos también diferentes géneros literarios como el cuento, la novela corta, la poesía y el teatro. Nos dedicamos al estudio de la narrativa comenzando con ejemplos de don Juan Manuel, y continuando con las Novelas ejemplares de Cervantes. Nos dedicamos a analizar la poesía de Fray Luis de León y sonetos de otros grandes poetas. También estudiamos el teatro, incluyendo una comedia de Lope de Vega. Entre los tópicos más importantes del curso se encuentran: la realidad y la imaginación; las ventajas y desventajas de la imaginación; la importancia de la magia y la astrología; el gobierno de un reino; los buenos y malos consejeros; la guerra y la salvación; los ideales renacentistas; el tema del desengaño, el contraste entre el estilo llano y el culteranismo y conceptismo; el sentido de la ejemplaridad; y el papel de la mujer en la sociedad. Veremos además cómo en España vivían conjuntamente cristianos, judíos y moros, y cómo convivían. PQ: SPAN 20300 or consent. Taught in Spanish.

Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos

Miguel Martínez
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21803

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX y XX. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España. Taught in Spanish.

Introducción a las Literaturas Hispánicas: Textos Hispanoamericanos del Modernismo al Presente

Agnes Lugo-Ortiz
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 22003
LACS 22003

En este curso haremos un recorrido panorámico por algunas de las principales tendencias de la escritura hispanoamericana y sus diásporas desde a finales del siglo XIX hasta el presente. Habremos de prestar particular atención no sólo a las dimensiones estéticas de los textos sino también a las condiciones socio-históricas y políticas que los posibilitaron y en las que, a su vez, ellos incidieron. Entre los autores y autoras a estudiar se encuentran José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, María Luisa Bombal, Horacio Quiroga, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Luis Rafael Sánchez y Pedro Pietri, entre otros/as. Taught in Spanish.

Introducción al análisis literario

Miguel Martínez
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21500

Through a variety of representative works of Hispanic literature, this course focuses on the discussion and practical application of different approaches to the critical reading of literary texts. We also study basic concepts and problems of literary theory, as well as strategies for research and academic writing in Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

Introduction à la littérature française des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles: Le duel dans la littérature

Julien Perrier-Chartrand
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 29616

Au cours des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, les représentations de duels abondent dans la littérature française. Or, plus que de simples ornements esthétiques, les scènes de combat singulier constituent une expression des changements idéologiques qui affectent la société d'Ancien Régime. Tant les procédés stylistiques utilisés pour dépeindre le duel que leur contexte d'énonciation expriment les configurations morales et philosophiques qui structurent successivement la pensée des contemporains.

Introduction à la poésie française du XXe siècle

Alison James
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 21740

Ce cours donnera un aperçu des grands courants poétiques du XXe siècle—de l’ “esprit nouveau” d’Apollinaire à la “littéralité” revendiquée par certains poètes contemporains—à travers la lecture et l'analyse de poèmes choisis dans des œuvres poétiques majeures. Nous examinerons notamment les transformations du lyrisme, l’évolution de la métrique et du vers libre, le poème en prose, les expérimentations visuelles et sonores, et les rapports entre la poésie et l’histoire. Parmi les poètes étudiés figurent Apollinaire, Reverdy, Éluard, Ponge, Char, Chedid, Métail, Roubaud, Bancquart, and Albiach. PQ: FREN 20500 or consent of instructor. Taught in French.

Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 12200

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages. PQ: 20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor.

Italian Renaissance Epic

Armando Maggi
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 22210/32210

This course examines the evolution of Italian Renaissance epic from Pulci to Marino. The course will emphasize the intertextual nature of this genre and its significant borrowings from classical sources. The course will not be limited to the most famous texts but will also include epics that have not received the critical attention they deserve, such as for example Lucrezia Marinella's "Enrico." Taught in Italian.

Italy and the Bomb

Maria Anna Mariani
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 34930/24930

A new form of literature, “indispensable for those who know and do not close their eyes” (Elias Canetti), was supposed to have emerged from the contemplation of the harrowing ruins of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This new literature was supposed to have been a form of reconciliation; and it should have been able to engender, with its rhetorical devices, an antidote against the human instinct of destruction. This is the kind of literature that Elsa Morante calls for in her lecture “For or Against the Atomic Bomb”, in which she chooses to tackle such a “gloomy topic”, and yet one that “nobody should dare ignore”—nobody, and especially not a writer.

During our course we will read essays and novels written throughout the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s that faced the issues posed by the atomic bomb. We will privilege Italian works, but we will also be attuned to the echoes of these themes within a global literary context. Topics to be investigated include the writer’s ethical response, the scientist’s responsibility and dilemmas, the spreading of apocalyptic fear, and the specter of humanity’s death drive.

Texts by a range of authors including De Martino, Morante, Moravia, Morselli, Sciascia, Volponi, Anders, Canetti, Oe, and Sebald will be discussed.

La figure du héros : de Corneille à Sartre

Isabelle Faton
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 24516

Du classicisme à l’existentialisme, la question de la représentation du héros dans l’œuvre littéraire a toujours été centrale. Pourquoi donner à un personnage un tel poids dans le récit ? Comment définir l’héroïsme et quelles sont ses formes ? En prenant en compte le genre littéraire et le contexte historique de chaque œuvre, nous nous attacherons dans ce cours à comprendre la nécessité du héros dans la fiction, et à analyser les motifs qui le poussent à agir et le résultat de ses actions. Nous examinerons les multiples facettes du héros : des grands héros tragiques de l’époque classique au personnage sartrien du XXème siècle en passant par le héros romantique.
Notre réflexion s’appuiera sur une lecture précise de certaines œuvres marquantes sur le sujet, écrites par des auteurs majeurs (Corneille, Voltaire, Balzac, Maupassant…) et appartenant à des genres littéraires différents. Taught in French.Du classicisme à l’existentialisme, la question de la représentation du héros dans l’œuvre littéraire a toujours été centrale. Pourquoi donner à un personnage un tel poids dans le récit ? Comment définir l’héroïsme et quelles sont ses formes ? En prenant en compte le genre littéraire et le contexte historique de chaque œuvre, nous nous attacherons dans ce cours à comprendre la nécessité du héros dans la fiction, et à analyser les motifs qui le poussent à agir et le résultat de ses actions. Nous examinerons les multiples facettes du héros : des grands héros tragiques de l’époque classique au personnage sartrien du XXème siècle en passant par le héros romantique.

Language, History, and Culture I : French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 20100

Courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

Language, History, and Culture I : Italian

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 20100

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Italian-speaking world through the reading of excerpts from contemporary Italian literature.

Language, History, and Culture I : Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20100

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Language, History, and Culture II : French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 20200

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Language, History, and Culture II : Italian

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 20200

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Italian-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items. Cultural awareness is enhanced through close study of contemporary Italian film and literature, as well as through in-class discussion.

Language, History, and Culture II : Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20200

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion. PQ: SPAN 20100 or placement.

Language, History, and Culture III : French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Language
FREN 20300

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society.

Language, History, and Culture III : Italian

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 20300

This course completes the study of the common grammatical functions and syntactical structures of the oral and written language and introduces students to description and analysis of a variety of texts through written, oral, listening, and reading activities. Students read a contemporary Italian novel and a selection of Italian poetry.

Language, History, and Culture III : Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 20300

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions. PQ: SPAN 20200 or placement. 

Las regiones del español

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 21100
LACS 21100

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions. PQ: Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

Le regioni italiane: lingua, dialetti, tradizioni

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Winter
2016-17
Italian Language
ITAL 21100

This course expands students' awareness of the diversity of the Italian language and culture. It emphasizes the interrelationship between language and culture, as well as social and historical transformations. We also study the Italian phonological system. Students are exposed to a wide variety of texts, both literary and nonliterary, as well as audio-visual materials that enhance their awareness of regional expressions and Italian dialects. Guest lecturers include native speakers from different Italian regions.

Literatura mexicana del siglo XIX

Laura Gandolfi
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29222
LACS 29200

This course examines multiple forms of Mexican literary and cultural production from the nineteenth century through the early twentieth century. Drawing from essays, poetry, fiction, travel narratives, photographs and illustrated magazines, the course focuses on key periods of social and artistic upheavals. We will start by examining the relationship between fiction writing and the nation-building process, as well as the link between the construction of a national “Mexican identity” and foreign travel narratives. We will then move to the second half of the century, exploring authors pertaining to the mayor literary movements of the period (in particular, romantic and realist novels), and we will analyze the textual and visual rhetoric associated with the costumbrista genre. We will conclude with modernista poetry, chronicles and short story. Readings in literary criticism and theory will engage with primary texts in the course as well. Taught in Spanish.

Literatura y música en el gran Caribe hispanohablante

Agnes Lugo-Ortiz
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 27510
LACS 27511

Uno de los aspectos más notables de las culturas del Caribe hispanohablante, tanto insular como continental, a todo lo largo del siglo XX, y hasta el presente, ha sido el diálogo sostenido entre la textualidad literaria y la música. Trama y melodía, palabra y ritmo se han buscado obsesivamente con la intención aparente de danzar. Sin embargo, las formas y registros resultantes de esa búsqueda han sido múltiples y no siempre armónicos. En este curso nos interesa trazar las distintas maneras en que la literatura ha invocado la inefabilidad aural de lo musical y reflexionar sobre sus posibles sentidos. Desde la forma del son en la poesía afroantillana, pasando por la estructura de las variaciones y fugas barrocas en la obra de Alejo Carpentier, hasta la incesante invocación al bolero y a la salsa en la narrativa más reciente, la escritura literaria en el Caribe más que decir parecería querer sonar y cantar. ¿Qué da cuenta de ello? ¿Cómo entender su particularidad? ¿Qué efectos produce? En el curso haremos una introducción básica al repertorio de formas musicales activados por ese decir literario, en ambos sus dimensiones estéticas e históricas, y examinaremos los sentidos de su apropiación y transformación por el hecho textual. Entre las posibles obras a estudiar se encuentran "Elogio de la plena " de Tomás Blanco, "El acoso" y Concierto barroco de Alejo Carpentier, La guaracha del Macho Camacho de Luis Rafael Sánchez, ¡Qué viva la música! de Andrés Caicedo, Maldito amor de Rosario Ferré, El entierro de Cortijo de Edgardo Rodríguez Juliá, Sólo cenizas hallarás de Pedro Vergés y Sabor a mí de Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, entre otras. Taught in Spanish.

Literature and Material Culture in Latin America

Laura Gandolfi
Level: Grad
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 34910
LACS 34910

This seminar will examine the intersection of material culture and Latin American literary and artistic production from the nineteenth century to the present. Using objects as lens, we will focus on the ways in which textual and visual representations of the inanimate world address questions concerning aesthetics, nationalism, gender, class, and human agency. Authors may include Jorge Isaacs, Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera, Amado Nervo, José Asunción Silva, and Felisberto Hernández. Theoretical readings by Agamben, Appadurai, Benjamin, Bodei, Clifford, Freud, Heidegger, Lukács, Marx, among others. Taught in Spanish.

Littérature et photographie

Alison James
Level: Both
Autumn
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 23711/33711

Ce cours se propose d’interroger les interactions entre littérature et photographie aux XIXe et XXe siècles à travers un parcours à la fois chronologique et thématique, en suivant trois pistes principales: l’influence du regard photographique sur l’écriture romanesque et poétique (Zola, Cendrars, Duras); les réflexions d’écrivains sur la photographie (Baudelaire, Barthes, Guibert); et les relations entre texte et image au sein du livre ou dans les œuvres de plasticiens (Rodenbach, Breton, Ernaux, Calle).Nous étudierons notamment: le rapport entre le visible et le lisible; la théorisation de l’image photographique; les fonctions narratives, illustratives et documentaires de l’image photographique dans la fiction et dans l’autobiographie; et l’histoire de la “photolittérature” comme genre spécifique. Des lectures théoriques et critiques accompagneront l’analyse des textes. PQ: FREN 20500 and one other literature class taught in French. Taught in French.

Machiavelli and Machiavellism

Rocco Rubini
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 23000/33001
FNDL 21603, CMLT 25801, LLSO 21603 REMS 33001 & CMLT 35801

This course is a comprehensive introduction to Machiavelli’s The Prince in light of his vast and varied literary corpus and European reception. The course includes discussion of Machiavelli as playwright (The Mandrake), fiction writer (Belfagor, The Golden Ass), and historian (Discourses, Florentine Histories). We will also closely investigate the emergence of myths surrounding Machiavelli (Machiavellism and anti-Machiavellism) in Italy (Guicciardini, Botero, Boccalini), France (Bodin and Gentillet), Spain (Ribadeneyra), and Northern Europe (Hobbes, Grotius, Spinoza) during the Counter Reformation and beyond. Course conducted in English. Those seeking Italian credit will do all work in Italian.

Montaigne dans l’histoire littéraire: inventions et récupérations

Philippe Desan
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 24410/34410
FNDL 24410

Qu’est-ce qui fait de Montaigne un auteur moderne ? Question qui semble d’actualité en ce début du XXIe siècle. La modernité de Montaigne consisterait ainsi à repérer dans les Essais ce que nous sommes devenus aujourd’hui. Comme si les questions que se posait l’auteur des Essais étaient aussi nos questions en ce début du XXIe siècle. Nous verrons comment la plupart des lectures “modernes” de Montaigne sont souvent l’expression d’une forme de récupération idéologique (inconsciente) qui vise à placer le sujet universel sur un piédestal, au détriment de sa dimension purement historique et politique. Nous étudierons également ce que l’on pourrait appeler l’invention de Montaigne au cours des siècles. Taught in French.

Pascal and Simone Weil

Thomas Pavel
Level: Both
Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 29100/31900
CMLT 29101/39101, FNDL 21806 FNDL 21812

The course will examine two major French existential thinkers, Blaise Pascal and Simone Weil, focusing on their intellectual background, their strong originality, and their religious perspective. PQ: Not open to first- and second-year undergraduates. Permission of instructor required.

Patronage & Culture in Renaissance Italy and Her Neighbors

Ada Palmer
Level: Grad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 41503
HIST 81503

A two-quarter research seminar; the first quarter may be taken separately as a colloquium with the instructor's permission. The great works of literature, philosophy, art, architecture, music, and science which the word "Renaissance" invokes were products of a complex system of patronage and hierarchy, in which local, personal, and international politics were as essential to innovation as ideas and movements. This course examines how historians of early modern Europe can strive to access, understand, and describe the web of hierarchy and inequality that bound the creative minds of Renaissance Europe to wealthy patrons, poor apprentices, distant princes, friends and rivals, women and servants, and the many other agents, almost invisible in written sources, who were vital to the production and transformation of culture

Patronage & Culture in Renaissance Italy and Her Neighbors - 2

Ada Palmer
Level: Grad
Winter
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 41504
HIST 81504

A two-quarter research seminar; the first quarter may be taken separately as a colloquium with the instructor's permission. The great works of literature, philosophy, art, architecture, music, and science which the word "Renaissance" invokes were products of a complex system of patronage and hierarchy, in which local, personal, and international politics were as essential to innovation as ideas and movements. This course examines how historians of early modern Europe can strive to access, understand, and describe the web of hierarchy and inequality that bound the creative minds of Renaissance Europe to wealthy patrons, poor apprentices, distant princes, friends and rivals, women and servants, and the many other agents, almost invisible in written sources, who were vital to the production and transformation of culture

Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers

Ana Lima
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 14100

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written Portuguese by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, Catalan or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to develop their abilities for further study. This class covers content from PORT 10100 and 10200. PQ: 20100 in another Romance Language or instructor’s consent.

Portuguese for Spanish Speakers

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Language
PORT 12200
LACS 12200

This class is intended for speakers of Spanish to develop competence quickly in spoken and written Portuguese. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their Spanish language skills to mastering Portuguese by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Pour une lecture sociologique de Rabelais

Philippe Desan
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 23110/33110

Nous verrons comment les romans de Rabelais s’inscrivent dans leur rapport à la modernité et posent des questions d’ordre sociologique. Nous lirons trois romans (Pantagruel, Gargantua, Tiers Livre) de façon à cerner les grands mouvements, idéologies, et rapports humains de la modernité. Taught in French.

Reading & Research: Catalan

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Catalan Literature
CATA 42100

Register by section number from faculty list on the web.

Reading & Research: French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 42100

Register by section number from faculty list on the web.

Reading & Research: Italian

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 42100

Register by section number from faculty list on the web.

Reading & Research: Portuguese

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Literature
PORT 42100

Register by section number from faculty list on the web.

Reading & Research: Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 42100

Register by section number from faculty list on the web.

Reading and Practice of the Short Story

Maria Anna Mariani
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 23410

What are the specific features of the short story? How does this literary form organize different visions of time and space? Informed by these fundamental theoretical questions, this course explores the logic of the short–story and investigates its position among literary genres. We will read together a selection of Contemporary Italian short-stories (privileging the production of Italo Calvino, Beppe Fenoglio, and Elsa Morante, but also including less visible authors, such as Goffredo Parise, Dino Buzzati, and Silvio D’Arzo). The moments of close reading and theoretical reflection will be alternated with creative writing activities, in which students will have the opportunity to enter in a deeper resonance with the encountered texts. This course is especially designed to help students improve their written Italian and literary interpretive skills. Taught in Italian.

Reading French for Research Purposes

Staff
Level: Both
Winter, Summer
2016-17
French Language
FREN 23333/33333

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. PQ: One quarter of French or equivalent, placement into FREN 10200, or an intermediate level of another Romance or classical language.

Reading Spanish for Research Purposes

Staff
Level: Both
Spring, Summer
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 23333/33333

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of Spanish to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. PQ: One quarter of French or equivalent, placement into SPAN 10200, or an intermediate level of another Romance or classical language.

Readings in Special Topics: Catalan

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Catalan Literature
CATA 29700

This course is directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Catalan. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter. PQ: CATA 10300 or 12200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Readings in Special Topics: French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 29700

This course involves directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in French. Subjects treated and work to be completed for this course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. PQ: FREN 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought.

Readings in Special Topics: Italian

Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Italian
ITAL 29700

This course provides directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Italian. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Readings in Special Topics: Portuguese

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Portuguese Literature
PORT 29700

This course is directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Portuguese. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter. PQ: PORT 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Readings in Special Topics: Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Autumn, Winter, Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29700

This course involves directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in Spanish. Subjects treated and work to be completed for this course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. PQ: SPAN 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought.

Renaissance and Baroque Fairytales and Their Modern Rewritings

Armando Maggi
Level: Both
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 26200/36200
CMLT 26700/36700, REMS 36200

We study the distinctions between myth and fairy tale, and then focus on collections of modern Western European fairy tales, including those by Straparola, Basile, and Perrault, in light of their contemporary rewritings of classics (Angela Carter, Calvino, Anne Sexton). We analyze this genre from diverse critical standpoints (e.g., historical, structuralist, psychoanalytic, feminist) through the works of Croce, Propp, Bettelheim, and Marie-Louise Von Franz.

Summer Intensive Elementary French

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Summer
2016-17
French Language
FREN 10123

This intensive elementary course will help students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken French and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Successfully completing this sequence will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

Summer Intensive Elementary Spanish

Staff
Level: Undergrad
Summer
2016-17
Spanish Language
SPAN 10123

This intensive elementary course will help students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken Spanish and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Successfully completing this sequence will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

Text/Image/Territory in Nineteenth-Century Latin America

Agnes Lugo-Ortiz
Level: Grad
Autumn
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 33710
LACS 33710

In this seminar we will explore how concepts of territory and territorialization were textually and visually articulated in nineteenth-century Latin America. Our inquiry will not only interrogate the aesthetic principles and procedures through which the nation (conceived as geography) was envisioned in the literature and arts of the period, most saliently around the figure of the landscape. We will also investigate alternative forms of spatialization related, yet irreducible, to the imperatives of the modern nation-state, such as the cognitive mappings associated to scientific explorations and to the symbolization of private property. What are the epistemological presuppositions and ideological implications of such practices? What scenarios did they produce? Who was deemed or destined to inhabit them, and within what temporality? In our discussions we will engage key theoretical works on space, territory and landscape (e.g. Lefebvre, Mignolo, Cosgrove, W.J.T. Mitchell, Casid, Mirzoeff) and may focus on literary texts by Bello, Echeverría, Sarmiento, Matto de Turner and Cirilo Villaverde, and on visual artifacts by Rugendas, Blanes, Laplante, Christiano Junior, and Velasco, among others. Taught in Spanish.

The Civilization of the Italian Renaissance: Science, Culture, & Society

Daniele Macuglia
Level: Undergrad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 29621
HIPS 29621

This course will provide an understanding of the major stages of the Italian Renaissance. Students will become acquainted not only with the flowering of science, letters, and the arts, but will immerse themselves in Renaissance life. Our journey will start in the Republic of Florence and continue on to the Kingdom of Naples, up to Rome and the Papacy, the Maritime States, Ferrara, Urbino, and the Duchy of Milan. We will learn about Dante, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Giordano Bruno, focusing on topics such as the Copernican Revolution, the rise of the printing press, diseases and their remedies, intricate dynamics of power and patronage, the Roman Inquisition, and the fascinating figure of the Renaissance Man. Students will develop critical thinking and learn to express themselves on topics of major concern in Italian society from the Late Middle Ages to the dawn of the Age of Enlightenment. The class will also involve a visit to the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Form of Politics/The Politics of Form

Jennifer Wild
Level: Grad
Spring
2016-17
French Literature
FREN 33410
CMST 67208

This seminar will examine how twentieth-century filmmakers and artists have deployed form and formal experiment to engage not simply politics, but the visual, discursive, and material field of political life and experience. While our study will broadly proceed by way of a study of techniques such as collage, montage, and photomontage; the diagram, the readymade, and appropriation; realism and materiality; and event-based and urban-geographical strategies, we will also engage several philosophical texts on the subject, namely, Jacques Rancière's The Politics of Aesthetics. Consequently, our study will advance a discussion about the dialectical relationship between "form" and "aesthetics," while we will also interrogate the evolution of "politcial subjectivity" and its modes of being and expression in twentieth-century film, art, and life. Additionally, this seminar is designed to coincide with and compliment the yearlong project "Concrete Happenings" in the Department of Art History, and the associated symposium on "Fluxus and Film" that will take place in the spring term.

The Italian Renaissance

Ada Palmer
Level: Both
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 22914/32914
HIST 22900/32900, CLCV 22914, CLAS 32914

Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250–1600), with a focus on literature and primary sources, the recovery of lost texts and technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the Church in Renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome.     

The Making & Unmaking of Petrarch's Canzoniere

Justin Steinberg
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 22600/32600
FNDL 22601

This course is an intensive reading of Petrarch's influential and groundbreaking self-anthology. Petrarch's collecting and ordering of his own work is in many ways without precedent. We examine in particular the historical redactions of the Canzoniere, its status as a work-in-progress, what Petrarch excluded from its various forms (especially the Rime disperse), early drafts, and authorial variants. The emergence of a new role for the vernacular author and the shifting space of handwriting and the book are central concerns in our discussions, and we make frequents use of facsimiles and diplomatic editions.

Theater and Performance in Latin America

Danielle Roper
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 29117/39117
LACS 29117/39117, TAPS 28479 GNSE 29117, GNSE 39117, CRES 29117, CRES 39117

This course is an introduction to theatre, performance, and visual art in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will examine the intersection of performance and social life by looking at performance practices in key historical moments in Latin America and the Caribbean. We ask: how have embodied practice, theatre and visual art been used to negotiate particular moments in Latin American history? We will study performances during independence, revolution, dictatorships, processes of democratization, truth and reconciliation, as well as the rise of neoliberalism. In our investigation, we will pay close attention to how ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality are articulated and disseminated within these performances at critical historical junctures. Our corpus may include blackface performance traditions in the Caribbean, indigenous performance, queer performance and we will look closely at the artistic works of Coco Fusco, Neo Bustamante, Las Yeguas del Apocalipsis, Yuyachkani, Griselda Gámbaro, and others. We will also read key theoretical work in Performance Studies including the work Joseph Roach, Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, Jill Lane, and others. PQ: Open to third- and fourth-year undergraduates only. Taught in English.

Theories of Autobiography

Maria Anna Mariani
Level: Grad
Autumn
2016-17
Italian Literature
ITAL 35210
CMLT 35210

Ambiguous and elusive by definition, the autobiographical genre has attracted generations of critics determined to identify its specificity and define its boundaries. Throughout the course we will examine the main theories relevant to the study of autobiography, reflecting at the same time on various problematic aspects of the genre that literary theorists have long discussed: the pitfalls of personal identity, the presumption of pronouncing one’s final words when one’s life is not yet over, the untruthful mediation of writing, and the paradoxes of memory. We will focus our inquiries to the English, French and Italian contexts, analyzing in particular the theories developed by Gusdorf, Starobinski, Lejeune, Ricœur, De Man, Olney, Battistini, D’Intino. Part of our task will be to test these approaches against narratives produced in different historical periods.

Traducción y piratería en el mundo colonial

Larissa Brewer-García
Level: Grad
Spring
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 32810
LACS 32810

Translation and piracy can both involve the strategic appropriation of language, knowledge, or property. This course analyzes the relationship between translation and piracy in the creation of foundational works of colonial Latin American literature. As students read texts about colonial encounters, conquests, piracy, and conversion, they will become familiar with early histories of translation in Latin America and a variety of early modern, modern, and post-colonial translation theories. Taught in Spanish.

Witches, Sinners, and Saints

Larissa Brewer-García
Level: Both
Winter
2016-17
Spanish Literature
SPAN 26210/36210
LACS 26212/36212 GNSE 36210, CRES 26220, CRES 36220

This course examines representations of women's bodies and sexualities in colonial Latin American writings. In doing so, we will study the body through a variety of lenses: the anatomical body as a site of construction of sexual difference, the witch's body as a site of sexual excess, the mystic's body as a double of the possessed body, the tortured body as a site of knowledge production, and the racialized bodies of New World women as sites to govern sexuality, spirituality, labor, and property in the reaches of the Spanish Empire. Taught in Spanish.